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Men, Women, Wild - Netflix

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Surviving in the wild is hard enough, but imagine braving Mother Nature with only the clothes on your back, the gear you can fit in one bag... and your significant other. New Discovery Channel series Men, Women, Wild is a modern tale of survival in which three survivalist couples - including a husband and wife, a boyfriend and girlfriend, and a mother and father - endure the ultimate test of their skills and relationships by taking on the most intense survival journey of their lives. From Renegade 83, creators of Emmy-nominated series Naked and Afraid and this summer's No. 1 new unscripted cable series Naked and Afraid XL, the series premiere of Men, Women, Wild airs Wednesday, November 11 at 10:00 PM ET/PT on the Discovery Channel. Men, Women, Wild is a 6-part series told from the survivalists' unique point of view. The couples will be dropped off in three of the harshest environments in the world, and for three weeks they will have to live off of the land, navigate the vast, unknown terrain and find their way back to civilization, but only if they can survive the wild and each other. Throughout each journey, the couples will share their experience and lead viewers through their triumphs and setbacks as they attempt to survive.

Men, Women, Wild - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: To Be Determined

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-11-11

Men, Women, Wild - Lesbian - Netflix

A lesbian is a homosexual woman. The word lesbian is also used to describe women in terms of their sexual identity or sexual behavior regardless of sexual orientation, or as an adjective to characterize or associate nouns with female homosexuality or same-sex attraction. The concept of “lesbian”, to differentiate women with a shared sexual orientation, is a 20th-century construct. Throughout history, women have not had the same freedom or independence to pursue homosexual relationships as men, but neither have they met the same harsh punishment as homosexual men in some societies. Instead, lesbian relationships have often been regarded as harmless and incomparable to heterosexual ones unless the participants attempted to assert privileges traditionally enjoyed by men. As a result, little in history was documented to give an accurate description of how female homosexuality is expressed. When early sexologists in the late 19th century began to categorize and describe homosexual behavior, hampered by a lack of knowledge about homosexuality or women's sexuality, they distinguished lesbians as women who did not adhere to female gender roles and incorrectly designated them mentally ill—a designation which has been reversed in the global scientific community. Women in homosexual relationships responded to this designation either by hiding their personal lives or accepting the label of outcast and creating a subculture and identity that developed in Europe and the United States. Following World War II, during a period of social repression when governments actively persecuted homosexuals, women developed networks to socialize with and educate each other. Greater economic and social freedom allowed them gradually to be able to determine how they could form relationships and families. With second wave feminism and growth of scholarship in women's history and sexuality in the 20th century, the definition of lesbian broadened, sparking a debate about sexual desire as the major component to define what a lesbian is. Some women who engage in same-sex sexual activity may reject not only identifying as lesbians but as bisexual as well, while other women's self-identification as lesbian may not align with their sexual orientation or sexual behavior. Sexual identity is not necessarily the same as one's sexual orientation or sexual behavior, due to various reasons, such as the fear of identifying their sexual orientation in a homophobic setting. Portrayals of lesbians in the media suggest that society at large has been simultaneously intrigued and threatened by women who challenge feminine gender roles, and fascinated and appalled with women who are romantically involved with other women. Women who adopt a lesbian identity share experiences that form an outlook similar to an ethnic identity: as homosexuals, they are unified by the heterosexist discrimination and potential rejection they face from their families, friends, and others as a result of homophobia. As women, they face concerns separate from men. Lesbians may encounter distinct physical or mental health concerns arising from discrimination, prejudice, and minority stress. Political conditions and social attitudes also affect the formation of lesbian relationships and families in open.

Men, Women, Wild - The Hite Report - Netflix

Twenty-three years later, in 1976, sexologist Shere Hite published a report on the sexual encounters of 3,019 women who had responded to questionnaires, under the title The Hite Report. Hite's questions differed from Kinsey's, focusing more on how women identified, or what they preferred rather than experience. Respondents to Hite's questions indicated that 8% preferred sex with women and 9% answered that they identified as bisexual or had sexual experiences with men and women, though they refused to indicate preference. Hite's conclusions are more based on respondents' comments than quantifiable data. She found it “striking” that many women who had no lesbian experiences indicated they were interested in sex with women, particularly because the question was not asked. Hite found the two most significant differences between respondents' experience with men and women were the focus on clitoral stimulation, and more emotional involvement and orgasmic responses. Since Hite performed her study during the popularity of feminism in the 1970s, she also acknowledged that women may have chosen the political identity of a lesbian.

Men, Women, Wild - References - Netflix